Words of the Day

We encounter words on the quotidian. Every day we see words and use them in our diurnal routine. Fortunately for us English speakers, there is a handful of wonderful words that can be used to describe our days.

For all the morning people out there, we always see the all-too-familiar a.m. This acronym is actually the latin ante meridiem, which translates to “before midday.” Dawn is often the term used to identify the earliest part of the day when the sun shines. Another favorable word for this is antelucan. Again, the latin roots translate to “before light.”

Conversely, night owls are much more comfortable in the p.m. or post meridiem. As you can guess, this means “after noon.” Unfortunately for us curious linguists, there is no clever acronym for f.m. Come twilight, when the sun sets, us verbivores prefer the ominous crepuscular. A great adjective, crepuscular refers to anything occurring during twilight. You know those rays of light that poke through the clouds? Those are crepuscular rays. If you are more of a sleeper then you are the mesonoxian type. Latin for “middle of the night,” mesonoxian is anything at midnight.

The two words I used in the introductory paragraph refer to anything that happens daily. Quotidian, roughly translated, means “every day.” When you say something is quotidian, it happens on a daily basis. Likewise, diurnal relates to the happening of the day. Unlike most of the other words, diurnal comes from the evolved diurnalis, meaning daily. With this daily dose of words, you may now enjoy your days, ante meridiem to mesonoxian!

 

For further reading: The Grand Panjandrum  by J.N. Hook 
Word Drops by Paul Anthony Jones (2015)

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